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Posts Tagged ‘tam-culture’

Here’s a little ode to my alma mater, keeping in tune with the nostalgia-flooded posts that I’ve been coming up with of late. It’s been over four years since I passed out, and the visits to my school (despite living just a couple of hours away) have been thinning down. I’d read Amrutha write about how Chennai had changed over the years, and my primary school memories were rekindled.

Yes yes, we all wish we went back to those toddler days of primary schools, when all we had to worry about was passing the next tamizh tervu (Tamil test) or finishing that Hydrilla experiment without breaking the glassware borrowed from the Quest lab or the School day rehersals. No career driven plans, no worries on earning, no issues on being single, no need to drive anything but the bicycle with side wheels ensuring I don’t fall, no need to blog! 😛

And I’m dedicating this post to a particular aspect of my school days – music! Vidya Mandir was one of the finest schools in the city (no this isn’t open to debate, and any libels in the comment section will be deleted: a warning to P.S. products), and a considerable amount of importance was given to extracurricular activities. In the undying words of K.S.R.,

Vidya mandir students are allowed to grow. PS students are made to grow. DAV paththi sollave venam.

Now, coming back to praising extracurriculars, learning music – both Indian and Western was an integral part of our school-life. The Indian music classes were invariably praises to several Hindu Gods on the likes of Muruga muruga thirumaal maruga neatly printed on a book titled Gaanamanjari, and were never enjoyed as much as the Western music classes were.

No, we didn’t have rock bands playing or Bryan Adams singing, but what we had was priceless – a nice big piano and a dedicated teacher whose name was Meena miss (often confused by parents with another teacher with the same name, but the kids knew who’s who). There were so many songs I still remember: some Christmas carols, some romantic, some just plain funny! The class was invariably split gender-wise (almost was an unsaid rule – we just never interacted until we came of a certain age, if I might put it that way), and the girls usually almost always were annoyed with the boys singing Oh my darling, oh my darling, oh my darling, Clementine (varying the extended e at the end of Clementine making it sound more like a donkey’s bray). Another favourite was the Twelve days of Christmas, counting down to a partridge on a pear tree.

Hole in my bucket

And the hole in my bucket in the title is with reference to this infinite-loop song, which usually involved the whole class being split into two – the boys playing Henry in chorus, and the girls becoming Liza. I still remember one instance when we sang it twice in series, almost like film buffs screaming “once more, once more” on seeing their favourite numbers. And here’s the lyrics for those of you who have been in that room and sung that song:

There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,
There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, a hole.
Then fix it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Then fix it, dear Henry, dear Henry, fix it.
With what shall I fix it, dear Liza, dear Liza?
With what shall I fix it, dear Liza, with what?
With some straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
With some straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, some straw.
The straw is too long, dear Liza, dear Liza,
The straw is too long, dear Liza, too long,
Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, cut it.
With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, dear Liza?
With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, with what?
With an axe, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
With an axe, dear Henry, dear Henry, an axe.
The axe is too dull, dear Liza, dear Liza,
The axe is too dull, dear Liza, too dull.
Then whet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Then whet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, whet it.
With what shall I whet it, dear Liza, dear Liza?
With what shall I whet it, dear Liza, with what?
With a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
With a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, a stone.
The stone is too dry, dear Liza, dear Liza,
The stone is too dry, dear Liza, too dry.
Then moisten it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Then moisten it, dear Henry, dear Henry, moisten it.
With what shall I moisten, dear Liza, dear Liza?
With what shall I moisten, dear Liza, with what?
Try water, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Try water, dear Henry, dear Henry, try water.
From where shall I get it, dear Liza, dear Liza?
From where shall I get it, dear Liza, from where?
From the well, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
From the well, dear Henry, dear Henry, the well.
In what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, dear Liza?
In what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, in what?
In a bucket dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
In a bucket dear Henry, dear Henry, in a bucket.
There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,
There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, a hole.

*Book picture courtesy Boyds Mills Press.

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Inspired from Manasi’s (her’s from here).

Simple logic: title says it all!

Theme: things related to Singaara Chennai.

Reliance opens new iStore. So sterile!

Naidu hall: the family store. Really?

Sterling joins College: Haddows is born.

Rajini film release. 1st week house-full.

Sathyam cinemas: expensive, but worth it!

“Mylapore to Airport auto.” “Rs. 500.” Walk.

Chennai metro underway. 100ft road halved.

Kapali temple Therottam festival. Colourful joy!

House without mummy. Full bottle thanni.

Swine flu in Pune. Chennai-ites masked!

ARR concert. Off city. Still rocks!

FB chat with Nick. Better theme:

What else, but full-time college bitching?

Four years in Hellore. Leeds. Yay! (dedicated to Nick)

Four gone. Two more again? WTF?! (my sad plight)

New ProCs. New reforms. Still sucks.

Convocation day. Party hangover pending. Whaaaa?!

Mid-night walks, random spots, missing dots. (?!)

Open ticket. Two hour travel. Home! 😀

New IRCTC eat-out in Katpadi. Yum!

Feel free to add more lines.

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With this post, I begin my series of posts on places, people and practices I’ve bumped into. This post is to do with a little town in Tamil Nadu called Thirukkadaiyur. This town hosts a nice temple dedicated to Lord Shiva adressed as Amritaghateswarar, and the temple carries it’s own history and specialities. Whenever married men turn 60 or 80 in Tamil Nadu, they celebrate their birthday grand with thier kids and grandchildren. And the Shiva temple in Thirukadayur is considered very holy to celebrate their 60th wedding (as it’s termed in Tamil; technically it’s the husband’s 60th birthday, but hey, I really am not keen in probing into that).
Yes, it is quite an achievement to live sixty years now; and more so to have a marriage last till you turn sixty. But yes, when it does happen, the children enjoy hosting their parents’ wedding – and that is a beautiful thing to see.
So moving on to the travel segment, the occasion that dragged me et. my family to the town was my aunt and uncle celebrating thier 60th wedding day, or sashtiyaptha purthi (that’s Sanskrit I think). So we made a nice little road trip along the East cost of India from Chennai through to Pondicherry, followed by a not-so-enjoyable deviation through Cuddalore, Chidambaram, Sirkazhi, Vaitheeswaran Koil to Thirukkadaiyur (you go a little further and you’d reach Karaikkal). The town has the temple and one road leading from the main entrance of the temple to the highway across, containing not one Visa/Mastercard ATM. Yes, it is quite surprising it has electricity. But quite contrasting to the above mentioned features (or should I say feature-lesses), the town has fabulous guest-houses with wonderful air-conditioned rooms (which was quite soothing following the rather tiring drive) and ample parking space (I’m sure cities in India have a thing or two to learn from them).
The following day we prepped up, got dressed and made it to the temple. There was a mad-rush inside, with at least another 10-15 couples celebrating their weddings. It was a nice sight to see: happy faces, each set with their cameramen, their kalasams lined up, and chanting mantras which not everyone understands.
The entire ceremony was two days long, containing pujas, homams and bathing the couple in holy water. So after the function concluded, we drove back to Chennai. For those of you who’re more interested in knowing about the place, history, or how to get there, you can look it up good ‘ol wiki, or this post.

Temple gopuramWith this post, I begin my series of posts on places, people and practices I’ve bumped into. This post is to do with a little town in Tamil Nadu called Thirukkadaiyur. This town hosts a nice temple dedicated to Lord Shiva adressed as Amritaghateswarar here, and the temple carries it’s own history and specialities. Whenever married men turn 60 or 80 in Tamil Nadu, they celebrate their birthday in a big way with thier kids and grandchildren. And the Shiva temple in Thirukkadaiyur is considered very holy to celebrate their arupatham kalyanam (or 60th wedding in Tamil; technically it’s the husband’s 60th birthday, but hey, I really am not keen in probing into that; and kalyanam doesn’t necessarily have to mean wedding, as Sandhya rightly said).

Yes, it is quite an achievement to live sixty years now; and more so to have a marriage last till you turn sixty. But of course, when it does happen, the children enjoy hosting their parents’ wedding – and that is a beautiful thing to see.

Picture in picture feature enabled.

So moving on to the travel segment, the occasion that dragged me and my family to the town was my aunt and uncle celebrating thier 60th wedding day, or sashtiyaptha purthi. So we made a nice little road trip along the East cost of India from Chennai through to Pondicherry, followed by a not-so-enjoyable deviation through Cuddalore, Chidambaram, Sirkazhi, Vaitheeswaran Koil to Thirukkadaiyur (you go a little further and you’d reach Karaikkal). The town has the temple and one road leading from the main entrance of the temple to the highway across, containing not even one Visa/Mastercard ATM. Yes, it is quite surprising it has electricity. But quite contrasting to the above mentioned features (or should I say feature-lesses), the town has fabulous guest-houses (like Hotel Manivizha, where we stayed) with wonderful air-conditioned rooms (which was quite soothing following the rather tiring drive) and ample parking space (I’m sure cities in India have a thing or two to learn from them).

The following day we prepped up, got dressed and made it to the temple. There was a mad-rush inside, with at least another 10-15 couples celebrating their weddings. It was a nice sight to see: happy faces, each set with their cameramen, their kalasams lined up, and chanting mantras which not everyone understands.

Weddings

The entire ceremony was two days long, containing pujas, homams and bathing the couple in holy water (if you’re dumbstruck by the last clause, see image below).

Bathed

So after the function concluded, we drove back to Chennai. For those of you who’re more interested in knowing about the place, history, or how to get there, you can look it up good ‘ol wiki, or this post.

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